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Science Fiction: Stories and Contexts av…
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Science Fiction: Stories and Contexts (utgåvan 2008)

av Heather Masri (Redaktör)

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431450,379 (5)Ingen/inga
A selection of fiction by classic and emerging writers from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, grouped into major themes: alien encounters, artificial life, time, utopias and dystopias, disasters and apocalypses, and evolutions. The stories are complemented by contextual documents that suggest the scholarly, theoretical, and historical currents that drove the development of the genre.… (mer)
Medlem:tkenney426
Titel:Science Fiction: Stories and Contexts
Författare:Heather Masri (Redaktör)
Info:Bedford/St. Martin's (2008), Edition: 52199th, 1242 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:fiction, short stories, science-fiction, American, twentieth-century, literary criticism, textbook, anthology

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Science Fiction: Stories and Contexts av Heather Masri

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"Arena," by Fredric Brown (1944): 9.5
- well this is the best of the lot of the early ones, by a fairly wide margin. Genuinely a bit thrilling and inventive, even if it's main conceit has been used plenty since then, only a testament to its worth. Still, avoids most of the pitfalls of other older sff, namely the dialogue and wooden characterizations, or if they're there, they're momentarily subsumed enough underneath the main action as to not negatively impact the story. The prose is crisp and tight, and doesn't get bogged down in necessary description as to impede the forward momentum of the narrative. And the alien was done well, realistically other and menacing all the same.

"Mars is Heaven!" by Ray Bradbury (1948): 8
- I know this story -- there's an old Twilight Zone that is basically this story, and I have pretty vivid memories of watching it, from my parents bed on a Saturday afternoon most likely. It made quite an impression, in the way old genre stuff can on young minds [and the old is imperative too -- I think, somehow, that age matters and some alchemy happens with the black and white and the outdated methods of storytelling on a young mind; they understand stories and narratives, although this is different, this is foreign, and therefore it opens up an avenue towards deep impressionability]. Yet, reading it here, and even remembering the episode itself, I'm struck by how simultaneously clumsy and skillful the grisly denouement is rendered [story: astronauts on a mission to Mars are surprised, upon landing to see a replication of the Midwestern small-town ideal and, even more so, their dead relatives; they spend happy evenings with them only to realize, much too late, that they're actually Martian creatures, preying on their subconscious to lure them into a false sense of security before slaughtering them all]. We get the “realization” completely through the inner monologue of the captain, laying everything out for us. Yet, in the terse description of the captains fatal attempt to leave, Bradbury writes a with a palpable sense of dread and ominousness [as in the “brother’s” short, “but you're not thirsty” to the captains excuse for trying to leave].

"The Sandman," by E.T.A. Hoffmann (1816): 9
- Much more than a curio, I'd say. And much more than simply a piece of that non-English language genre-ish mass of literature that the English-language press and reading public seem so often perplexed by -- what is it? how do we categorize it? how in the world do we contextualize it against contemporaneous English-language lit -- this appears to me a valid complement to Frankenstein in terms of early thinking on AI, and, likely much more pertinently, in terms of engaging genre storytelling.
  Ebenmaessiger | Oct 9, 2019 |
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A selection of fiction by classic and emerging writers from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries, grouped into major themes: alien encounters, artificial life, time, utopias and dystopias, disasters and apocalypses, and evolutions. The stories are complemented by contextual documents that suggest the scholarly, theoretical, and historical currents that drove the development of the genre.

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