HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

Brancusi (Great Modern Masters) av Jose…
Laddar...

Brancusi (Great Modern Masters) (utgåvan 1997)

av Jose Maria Faerna (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygDiskussioner
222798,014 (3.67)Ingen/inga
Documents the life and work of the 20th-century Romanian sculptor, Constantin Brancusi, and includes photographs of his studio and work taken by himself. Although considered a pioneer of abstract art, Brancusi claimed only to simplify shapes and to strip them of realistic detail.

Ingen/inga.

Ingen/inga
Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

Visar 2 av 2

Sleeping Muse by Romanian born sculptor Constantin Brancusi (1876-1957)

Brancusi – A coffee table book with dozens of photographs and forty color plates of the artist’s work. Also included are a ten short essays by art critic Jose Maria Faerna. Below are quotes from the essays along with my comments. If anybody is unfamiliar with Brancusi, I highly recommend this book you in all likelihood will find at your local library or within the library system. If not, there are affordable copies available through amazon.

“Even as a young man, Brancusi, who was born in 1876, had felt the irrepressible urge to run away. As he wrote in his later years, “The revolving earth, the blowing wind, and the drifting clouds are my real home and my only family.” For Brancusi, contemplation of the world always amounted to a speculation about sculpture.” ---------- Other than perhaps reconnecting with family and friends, I could never understand how fully mature adults can be homesick from a particular city or country. I’m of a mind with Brancusi – as long as I can walk outside and look up at the sun and walk along sidewalks in safety, I am completely at home anywhere. And I love how Brancusi always linked his philosophical reflections with his capacity to create sculpture, which speaks to how a true artist is someone who lives and breathes their art twenty-four-seven, lives on the side of refined, aesthetic perception as a totally absorbing mode of being in the world.

“Reality,” Brancusi once said, “resides not in the external form of things but in their innermost essence. This fact entails the impossibility to express anything real while lingering on the surface of things.” --------- This is the spirit of both Platonism and also the simplicity of much Eastern art – to penetrate to the heart, to capture the universal in the particular, the clean line at the center of the natural world.


THE KISS – “This strikingly stark sculpture represents a man and a woman tightly holding each other as if they were a single compact unit. Its symmetrical composition as well as the simplicity and purity of its lines are extremely original.” ---------- When I was in my freshman year at a university in Kentucky, during a lecture in front of 200 students, my English instructor said this sculpture portrayed how silly the act of kissing looks. I didn’t say anything but even then I didn’t understand how the instructor reached such a conclusion. Personally, I find the act of two people kissing beautiful and I think this Brancusi sculpture captures the sensitivity of two people coming together as one. By the way – I wonder what Ms. Campbell, that English instructor, would find beautiful in sculpture – perhaps some Civil War Memorial with soldiers standing at parade rest; to my mind, a type of sculpture memorial good for pigeons to perch on.


BIRD IN SPACE – “My whole life,” Brancusi is known to have said, “has been devoted to searching the essence of flight . . . Flying is such sheer joy!” With this sculpture, Brancusi has created a smooth form whose soaring aerodynamism is solely suggestive of flight, without resorting to any realistic detail whatsoever." ---------- When I had an opportunity to view this sculpture face-to-face in a museum, I felt the urge to run my finger up and down the smooth curve top to bottom. It is said that Piet Mondrian attempted to paint a rainbow as pure geometry. There is definitely a similar spirit in Brancusi with the curve capturing movement, especially flight. If one of Mondrian’s Red, Blue and Yellow Compositions could be magically melted down into a sculpture representing soaring geometry, it just might resemble Brancusi’s Bird.


THE NEWBORN 1: “In the case of the ovoid,” Ezra Pound wrote, “I imagine Brancusi wholly absorbed by the notion of a pure form, a form completely independent of all earthy weightiness and endowed with a life as autonomous as that of any geometric form.” ---------- Anytime I see an egg or an ovoid stone, I associate such with this Brancusi sculpture and imagine how one could shape the object into a compelling work of art. Such is the power of Brancusi, a creative eye to spur others on to an expanded vision.


SOCRATES: “What was truly important to Brancusi, what he aspired to with uncompromising rigor, was the most congruous correspondence between the materials employed in each work of art and the idea that the piece sought to evoke. This idea would have to arise from matter itself.”---------- Another mark of a true artist – respect for material. If a piece of sculpture was to be carved from wood, Brancusi worked with the grains and the wood’s feel and texture. With this particular wood sculpture, I can almost see Brancusi in his studio, in the very act of carving.


SELF-PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST IN HIS STUDIO: “Brancusi preferred that no one else take pictures of his works or his studio. He also shot photographs of himself, both at work and at rest, in a considerable number of self-portraits.” ----------- Ever the artist. He desired his vision of himself captured in photographs be the vision for the general public. I can appreciate and respect his judgement since with rare exception I myself have not enjoyed the photographs other people have taken of me – and I’m not even an artist.


BRANCUSI’S STUDIO: “Inside the studio – as documented by countless photographs taken by the artist – his works were indeed arranged with the upmost care so as to reveal their mutual relations.” ---------- Brancusi’s vision was total – not only his individual sculptures are important but the way they are positioned together in the space of his studio. And, along with this, how they are captured in the space of his studio via a photograph. For Constantin Brancusi, nothing but nothing was outside the box of art. ( )
  Glenn_Russell | Nov 13, 2018 |

Sleeping Muse by Romanian born sculptor Constantin Brancusi (1876-1957)

Brancusi – A coffee table book with dozens of photographs and forty color plates of the artist’s work. Also included are a ten short essays by art critic Jose Maria Faerna. Below are quotes from the essays along with my comments. If anybody is unfamiliar with Brancusi, I highly recommend this book you in all likelihood will find at your local library or within the library system. If not, there are affordable copies available through amazon.

“Even as a young man, Brancusi, who was born in 1876, had felt the irrepressible urge to run away. As he wrote in his later years, “The revolving earth, the blowing wind, and the drifting clouds are my real home and my only family.” For Brancusi, contemplation of the world always amounted to a speculation about sculpture.” ---------- Other than perhaps reconnecting with family and friends, I could never understand how fully mature adults can be homesick from a particular city or country. I’m of a mind with Brancusi – as long as I can walk outside and look up at the sun and walk along sidewalks in safety, I am completely at home anywhere. And I love how Brancusi always linked his philosophical reflections with his capacity to create sculpture, which speaks to how a true artist is someone who lives and breathes their art twenty-four-seven, lives on the side of refined, aesthetic perception as a totally absorbing mode of being in the world.

“Reality,” Brancusi once said, “resides not in the external form of things but in their innermost essence. This fact entails the impossibility to express anything real while lingering on the surface of things.” --------- This is the spirit of both Platonism and also the simplicity of much Eastern art – to penetrate to the heart, to capture the universal in the particular, the clean line at the center of the natural world.


THE KISS – “This strikingly stark sculpture represents a man and a woman tightly holding each other as if they were a single compact unit. Its symmetrical composition as well as the simplicity and purity of its lines are extremely original.” ---------- When I was in my freshman year at a university in Kentucky, during a lecture in front of 200 students, my English instructor said this sculpture portrayed how silly the act of kissing looks. I didn’t say anything but even then I didn’t understand how the instructor reached such a conclusion. Personally, I find the act of two people kissing beautiful and I think this Brancusi sculpture captures the sensitivity of two people coming together as one. By the way – I wonder what Ms. Campbell, that English instructor, would find beautiful in sculpture – perhaps some Civil War Memorial with soldiers standing at parade rest; to my mind, a type of sculpture memorial good for pigeons to perch on.


BIRD IN SPACE – “My whole life,” Brancusi is known to have said, “has been devoted to searching the essence of flight . . . Flying is such sheer joy!” With this sculpture, Brancusi has created a smooth form whose soaring aerodynamism is solely suggestive of flight, without resorting to any realistic detail whatsoever." ---------- When I had an opportunity to view this sculpture face-to-face in a museum, I felt the urge to run my finger up and down the smooth curve top to bottom. It is said that Piet Mondrian attempted to paint a rainbow as pure geometry. There is definitely a similar spirit in Brancusi with the curve capturing movement, especially flight. If one of Mondrian’s Red, Blue and Yellow Compositions could be magically melted down into a sculpture representing soaring geometry, it just might resemble Brancusi’s Bird.


THE NEWBORN 1: “In the case of the ovoid,” Ezra Pound wrote, “I imagine Brancusi wholly absorbed by the notion of a pure form, a form completely independent of all earthy weightiness and endowed with a life as autonomous as that of any geometric form.” ---------- Anytime I see an egg or an ovoid stone, I associate such with this Brancusi sculpture and imagine how one could shape the object into a compelling work of art. Such is the power of Brancusi, a creative eye to spur others on to an expanded vision.


SOCRATES: “What was truly important to Brancusi, what he aspired to with uncompromising rigor, was the most congruous correspondence between the materials employed in each work of art and the idea that the piece sought to evoke. This idea would have to arise from matter itself.”---------- Another mark of a true artist – respect for material. If a piece of sculpture was to be carved from wood, Brancusi worked with the grains and the wood’s feel and texture. With this particular wood sculpture, I can almost see Brancusi in his studio, in the very act of carving.


SELF-PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST IN HIS STUDIO: “Brancusi preferred that no one else take pictures of his works or his studio. He also shot photographs of himself, both at work and at rest, in a considerable number of self-portraits.” ----------- Ever the artist. He desired his vision of himself captured in photographs be the vision for the general public. I can appreciate and respect his judgement since with rare exception I myself have not enjoyed the photographs other people have taken of me – and I’m not even an artist.


BRANCUSI’S STUDIO: “Inside the studio – as documented by countless photographs taken by the artist – his works were indeed arranged with the upmost care so as to reveal their mutual relations.” ---------- Brancusi’s vision was total – not only his individual sculptures are important but the way they are positioned together in the space of his studio. And, along with this, how they are captured in the space of his studio via a photograph. For Constantin Brancusi, nothing but nothing was outside the box of art. ( )
  GlennRussell | Feb 16, 2017 |
Visar 2 av 2
inga recensioner | lägg till en recension

Ingår i serien

Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga platser
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Motto
Dedikation
Inledande ord
Citat
Avslutande ord
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På baksidan citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Kanonisk DDC/MDS

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska

Ingen/inga

Documents the life and work of the 20th-century Romanian sculptor, Constantin Brancusi, and includes photographs of his studio and work taken by himself. Although considered a pioneer of abstract art, Brancusi claimed only to simplify shapes and to strip them of realistic detail.

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Snabblänkar

Populära omslag

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (3.67)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5 2

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 155,690,317 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig