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Think No Evil: Inside the Story of the Amish…
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Think No Evil: Inside the Story of the Amish Schoolhouse Shooting...and… (urspr publ 2009; utgåvan 2009)

av Jonas Beiler, Shawn Smucker (Bidragsgivare)

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882245,059 (4.22)Ingen/inga
An insider's look into the events surrounding the nickel mines amish schoolhouse shootings--told by the counselor who was called upon to come to the farmhouse where the families met on that fateful day. On October 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, a local milk-tank truck driver, bound and shot ten young girls in an Amish schoolhouse before committing suicide. Five girls died. Five others were severely injured and left in critical condition. In the aftermath of the massacre, the Amish community shunned the media. But they requested that Amishraised counselor Jonas Beiler come to the scene to offer his moral and spiritual support. In Think No Evil, Beiler offers his first-person account of the events, as well as of those who were closest to the scene: the surviving children, the volunteer fireman Rob Beiler, the local counseling center director Brad Aldricha, and Vietta Zook, aboard the first ambulance to arrive. Beiler poignantly describes the Amish families' responses to this horrific violence as they reached out to the shocked family members of the killer, offering unconditional forgiveness. The story didn't end on that horrible day with the deaths of those five little girls. Think No Evil follows the ongoing story of this gentle community having faith in God's design, of truly demonstrating Christian values, of responding with resilient love in the face of evil, of demolishing the scene of the murders and rebuilding the schoolhouse, and of determining to move forward in living out their faith in peace.… (mer)
Medlem:MadameSynchro
Titel:Think No Evil: Inside the Story of the Amish Schoolhouse Shooting...and Beyond
Författare:Jonas Beiler
Andra författare:Shawn Smucker (Bidragsgivare)
Info:Howard Books (2009), Hardcover, 213 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:**
Taggar:Ingen/inga

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Think No Evil: Inside the Story of the Amish Schoolhouse Shooting...and Beyond av Jonas Beiler (2009)

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The nation—and much of the world—was shocked in October 2006 when headlines screamed the news of the shooting deaths of ten little Amish girls in their one-room schoolhouse in Pennsylvania. A day later, when the news got out that the Amish parents had visited the family of the shooter to offer forgiveness and reconciliation, the shock was even greater and the news spread even farther. How could such a horrendous act of violence against innocent children be forgiven?

Jonas Beiler grew up in an Amish community. As a teenager, he chose to leave because of his incurable love of automobiles. Think No Evil is Beiler’s memoir of the shootings and the events that followed. Writer Shawn Smucker, whose mother grew up Amish, was Beiler’s professional guide in the writing. At the time of the events about which they write, both men were living in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where the shootings took place. It was more than an Amish tragedy; it was a tragedy for everyone who lived in the area.

Beiler and his brother had operated an auto parts business until his brother’s accidental death. It was this death, as well as the death of his three-year-old daughter and a crisis in his marriage, that eventually motivated Beiler to found a counseling center. His status in the community as a counselor gained him access to the crime scene when others, even the parents of dying children, were kept behind the crime scene’s yellow plastic tape.

Beiler’s story is a very personal one. He begins by describing the community where he lives as an “English” (the Amish term for non-Amish) and where many of his friends descend from families who have occupied the area for more than two hundred years—as far back as the earliest settlements, before America’s United States had come into existence. Amish farmers in the area sell their produce and crafts—exquisite quilts, beautifully fashioned furniture, home-baked goods, and more—at weekend markets, festivals, and by the roadside. Sometimes roadside stands are not attended. Buyers choose their produce and leave their payment in a box.

It is in this atmosphere of trust and diligence that the unthinkable occurred.

There is no way to describe the scene Beiler witnessed without a sense of horror—the sight of ten little girls, blood-covered and lying on the grass outside the schoolhouse, as the first two EMTs arrive and begin their work to save whom they can and urgently move on to the next when it’s too late or looks to be too hopeless. Beiler, though, tells it with compassion and quiet dignity. He does not exploit the terrible anguish of the situation, and never ventures into the seamy journalistic language of shock and terror to prey upon his reader’s emotions.

The shooter was a local man. Charlie Roberts drove the milk truck that called on Amish farms to collect their day’s production to be taken to the dairy for bottling. They knew his face. They knew he had a wife and children who lived in the area. They knew he attended a local church. Nothing about it made sense.

Beiler describes the wakes, the funerals, the Amish meetings with the Roberts family to share in their loss. He describes the tearing down of the schoolhouse where the shootings took place and the building of a new one, farther from the road, hidden safely behind trees. He tells us how things were a year later, about the picnic where he saw the five young girls who survived the shootings, how one of them who was expected to die now lives on in a wheelchair.

When he completes his telling of the tale, Beiler attempts to answer the question that everyone has been asking, “How can they forgive?” and the question that he and others asked themselves, “What can we learn to help us more gracefully carry our own burdens?”

His answers begin with a history of the Amish, their founding 500 years ago in Germany, their settlements in the New World, the forming and honing of their commitment to forgiveness and reconciliation. He tells of his own challenges—the deaths of his brother and daughter, the affair that nearly destroyed his marriage—and how they were overcome with the help of caring therapists and the practice of forgiveness.

Whether you simply want to know the inside story of the Amish schoolhouse shootings, or you want to understand more deeply the practice of forgiveness that Beiler addresses in his last two chapters, this is a fine personal memoir of an event that captured the attention of millions across the globe—not because of its senseless brutality, but because of the nearly impossible-to-believe forgiveness extended by the victims.

“The Amish will be the first to tell you they’re not perfect,” Beiler writes, “but they do a lot of things right. Forgiveness is one of them.” That is the story he set out to write, he tells us, “how ordinary human beings ease their own pain by forgiving those who have hurt them.” ( )
  bookcrazed | Jan 11, 2012 |
Wow, an amazing look into the mindset of the Amish. Make one re-think how you think about forgiveness. A must read. ( )
  jonhovis | Oct 22, 2009 |
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I would like to dedicate this book to the community of Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania, and the people who have been forever changed by such a horrific event, the families who lost precious children, the first responders, and the pastors and counselors who showed up immediately to support the community.  
To those who will continue to mourn and choose to forgive every day, my prayer is that you will find yourself on a path of recovery and that a new normal will bring with it some measure of redemption.  May God's grace be with all who struggle to forgive and those who long to be forgiven.
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An insider's look into the events surrounding the nickel mines amish schoolhouse shootings--told by the counselor who was called upon to come to the farmhouse where the families met on that fateful day. On October 2, 2006, Charles Roberts, a local milk-tank truck driver, bound and shot ten young girls in an Amish schoolhouse before committing suicide. Five girls died. Five others were severely injured and left in critical condition. In the aftermath of the massacre, the Amish community shunned the media. But they requested that Amishraised counselor Jonas Beiler come to the scene to offer his moral and spiritual support. In Think No Evil, Beiler offers his first-person account of the events, as well as of those who were closest to the scene: the surviving children, the volunteer fireman Rob Beiler, the local counseling center director Brad Aldricha, and Vietta Zook, aboard the first ambulance to arrive. Beiler poignantly describes the Amish families' responses to this horrific violence as they reached out to the shocked family members of the killer, offering unconditional forgiveness. The story didn't end on that horrible day with the deaths of those five little girls. Think No Evil follows the ongoing story of this gentle community having faith in God's design, of truly demonstrating Christian values, of responding with resilient love in the face of evil, of demolishing the scene of the murders and rebuilding the schoolhouse, and of determining to move forward in living out their faith in peace.

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