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The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (The…
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The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (The Inheritance Trilogy Book 1) (utgåvan 2009)

av N. K. Jemisin (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
3,4182492,862 (3.89)339
Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky. There, to her shock, Yeine is named an heiress to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle with cousins she never knew she had. As she fights for her life, she draws ever closer to the secrets of her mother's death and her family's bloody history.… (mer)
Medlem:ktshpd
Titel:The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (The Inheritance Trilogy Book 1)
Författare:N. K. Jemisin (Författare)
Info:Orbit (2010), Edition: Original, 417 pages
Samlingar:Own, Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:to-read, own-e

Verkdetaljer

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms av N. K. Jemisin

  1. 70
    Who Fears Death av Nnedi Okorafor (electronicmemory)
    electronicmemory: Who Fears Death is post-apocalyptic futuristic fantasy and The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms draws from classical sword and sorcery, but both are excellent novels about heroines who have found themselves beset and gifted (or possibly cursed) by powers beyond reckoning, while caught up in a political and supernatural power struggle that spans generations and eventually time itself.… (mer)
  2. 51
    The Broken Kingdoms av N. K. Jemisin (electronicmemory)
  3. 30
    Warbreaker av Brandon Sanderson (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both are epic fantasy novels featuring strong female characters and focusing on gods in the respective fantasy worlds and their interactions with humans
  4. 30
    The God Engines av John Scalzi (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For the tools of chained gods.
  5. 31
    Vindens namn av Patrick Rothfuss (aulandez)
    aulandez: Both are strong first person narrated adventures of out-of-place heroes, and take familiar fantasy tropes and deconstruct them with intelligence and some wit.
  6. 20
    City of Stairs av Robert Jackson Bennett (calmclam)
    calmclam: Similar themes of empire and colonialism as well as wars against/between the gods.
  7. 21
    Racing the Dark av Alaya Dawn Johnson (PhoenixFalls)
    PhoenixFalls: Another female protagonist dragged into the affairs of the gods in a non-white high fantasy setting.
  8. 32
    The Sandman: Preludes & Nocturnes av Neil Gaiman (MyriadBooks)
  9. 10
    Paladin of Souls av Lois McMaster Bujold (storyjunkie)
  10. 10
    The Initiate av Louise Cooper (luciente)
  11. 10
    Dragon Sword and Wind Child av Noriko Ogiwara (kaionvin)
    kaionvin: Dueling gods, reincarnation, child-like characters, and a female protagonist who gets involved in it all.
  12. 11
    Lord of Light av Roger Zelazny (Shrike58)
    Shrike58: The cost of the abuse of divine powers, political & social intrigue, and a sprawling setting.
  13. 00
    Tjuven Althalus av David Eddings (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Another epic fantasy tale featuring gods
  14. 00
    Priestess of the White av Trudi Canavan (luciente)
  15. 12
    The Black Jewels Trilogy av Anne Bishop (aboulomania)
  16. 02
    Elfland av Freda Warrington (majkia)
    majkia: both are well-written creative takes on normal fantasy tropes
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» Se även 339 omnämnanden

engelska (249)  tyska (1)  Alla språk (250)
Visa 1-5 av 250 (nästa | visa alla)
I didn't realize that this was N.K.Jemisin's debut novel until later on during my reading, so I guess it was too much of me to expect a brilliant book like The Fifth Season. This book was enjoyable enough, especially the world building and some good characters.

This book is the story of Yiene Darr, the outcast granddaughter of the ruler of the hundred thousand kingdoms who has been summoned to the capital city of Sky as named one of the three heirs. We understand early on that this is going to turn into a tale of political intrigue, scheming and plotting. What surprised me is that I got more than I bargained for. In bits and pieces, we get to know the story of the God's war, the winners and losers and the enslaving of the Night Lord and his godling children who now serve the ruling Arameri family. How their lives get interconnected with Yiene and her quest for truth and freedom forms the remainder of the book.

Yiene is equal parts fierce, timid, impulsive and cautious whereas the Night Lord comes across as a clichéd brooding bad turned good hero of a romantic novel. The childlike godling Sieh is probably the most fascinating and fun in the book. This book is clearly established as the first of a trilogy and it looks like the intention was for extensive mythical world building, which is done quite well rather than well developed characterizations. The series shows promise and I hope the sequel is much more satisfying. ( )
  ksahitya1987 | Aug 20, 2021 |
Hi! I read The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, and absolutely loved it. First book of hers I've ever read. Most of what I read is textbooks (thanks, school!) and self-help, so it was a treasure to read for pleasure. She is my favorite author so far; I will be reading all her other works now, I'm sure!

One of my favorite things was the concept of choosing to be a child, how she explored what that means and the struggle to stay in a mindset like that when life gets hard. I won't spoil it, but one of the 'solutions' was just wonderful, and applicable to all our lives!
The author did a lot of hooks, in which she would start revealing something, then back track and get to it later, likely to create suspense. It was welcome 80% of the time, but seemed to happen a bit too often, in my opinion.
I absolutely loved, loved, loved her writing. Every interaction she wrote about seemed interlaced with philosophy and awareness, as if she truly understood each character in all their complex depth. Morality was questioned in tricky ways, as we followed the protagonist as she uncovered more and more understanding of the characters around her.
Usually, sex scenes in a novel turn me off, as they seem forced and as if someone had a thesaurus in hand. But hers were done in a thoughtful way, more about interpretation and mental experience than a detailed physical narrative. Quite beautiful.

Only critique I have is that I struggled with the names. There were a couple times I thought we were talking about one character, but then I had mixed up the names in my head. I think this is because most of the names I had never heard before, so it took a few chapters before I easily recognized them, lol! So, I wish I would have kept a list of who everyone is, in relation to the main character (aka so-and-so is her mother, so-and-so is her grandfather, etc). ( )
  krissyzzz | Aug 9, 2021 |
It’s a good job I read the killing moon before I read this novel otherwise I doubt I would give this author another go, I was expecting a lot of intrigue , I hardly got any intrigue for my tastes instead I got the MC pining for a handsome god. Not for me ( )
1 rösta Eclipse777 | Jun 27, 2021 |
I read The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N. K. Jemisin as the January Challenge from Jawas Read, Too! and I don’t believe she could have picked a stronger novel to start the year with. Part political thriller, part theological fantasy, Jemisin crafts a rich and remarkable world that is as beautiful as it is deadly.

To sum up the story without giving much away, not long after her mother’s death Yeine is summoned away from her barbarian country to the capital seat by the grandfather her mother ran away from years before. Once she arrives at Sky, the floating city and control center for the Arameri family, she is named heir and told to fight for her life against the other two possible heirs. Yeine soon realizes that much is wrong in this glittering city above the ground. There are gods trapped and used as weapons by the central members of the Arameri family. She has no idea of who she can trust. Yeine fights for her own life and those of the people she left behind, while also trying to solve her mother’s murder and free the enslaved gods before it is too late. This is the stuff true fantasy epics are made of.

It took me a bit to adjust to the first person narrative that seemed to run all over the place, but once I sank in I really began to enjoy Yeine’s perspective. Yeine is fallible and breakable in ways more heroines should be. Jemisin wrote The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms in such a way that it felt like I was there when everything was happening, not something that happened a while ago and was being told to me. This made for a lovely reading experience. The way she wrote the enslaved gods, as well, was quite believable. Your heart breaks for them, but they still frighten you the way a living god should.

There was one thing I found heavy handed. The book is wrought with “not everything light and shining is beautiful” which has been done so many times before. What saves it in this book is how well it is written, and that she has darkness much in the same. Without the balance between the two there is disharmony and this affects everything throughout the world.

I am still shocked by how absorbed I became while reading this book. Without giving it away, the ending could be described as predictable, but I honestly didn’t care. I didn’t see another way for the book to wrap up that would have been satisfactory, and it left me to wonder what would happen with the world and characters afterwards. Sometimes the most clichéd ending can work if the book is written well enough. I will be picking up the sequel as soon as I can. Perhaps it is because I am very tired of the traditional sword and sorcery fantasies, but The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms affected me in much the same way that Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor did. (Expect a review on that one to come eventually.) I knew in both that there was only one way the story could end, but it didn’t ruin the story for me in the least. When it was over all I felt was this rush of joy that can only be found at the end of a book that was well worth your time.

I could not put down The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms until I finished it, and there is really no stronger recommendation I can give than that. ( )
  taimoirai | Jun 25, 2021 |
Let us get the biases out of the way immediately: This is right up my alley. A large scope fantasy world based on the cynical intrigues of the elite, where an intelligent but comparatively naïve young girl gets unwillingly drawn into the centre of events, that's pretty much what I am looking for in a novel. Add to that the amazingly rich concept of the enslaved deities walking around the palace, and you have a pretty great experience.

Since I mostly liked everything about the novel, the following will single out the few things I didn't, but don't let that turn you off it. It is a solid novel.

I found the ending to be good (a relief, as the last time I read a book I was similarly happy with the premise and execution of as I read it, 'The Goblin Emperor', the lacklustre ending retroactively soured the experience a bit), though the largers strokes of the conclusion are a bit expected. Details and minor twists during it managed to surprise me, sure, but the overall outcomes were pretty much as I thought they would be since much earlier in the story. Now, I'm happy with this ending, it is well executed and satisfying, I just wish it'd felt a bit more mindblowing.

The only other criticism I have is a small one: The love/terror infatuation the protagonist quickly develops with the most dangerous of the enslaved deities. This feels cliched teen angst-like to me (though the character's age does make teen angst quite plausible). It is thankfully usually handled with some measure of grace (and genuine terror), doesn't take up too much of the narrative, and serves important functions in the themes as well as the character motivations and growth. So the problem here is likely to be more with my prejudices against the mortal teenager and the dangerous attraction to the immortal dark being than with the actual story.

There is a complex-but-not-as-complex-as-one-first-might-think family history for the protagonist to slowly unveil as the story progresses, providing a nice mystery subplot. This I like. I might wish a bit more time had been spent on the mortal political machinations and court intrigue than on the Big Questions discussed with the enslaved gods in the second half of the novel, but that's just personal preference. This is an exciting world with an engrossing narrative style (it is all in told the first person, and told well), and I'm quite excited to read the rest of the series. ( )
  Lucky-Loki | Jun 18, 2021 |
Visa 1-5 av 250 (nästa | visa alla)
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms definitely leaves me wanting more of this delightful new writer.
tillagd av Jannes | ändraLocus Magazine, Farren Miller (Mar 6, 2011)
 

» Lägg till fler författare (6 möjliga)

Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Jemisin, N. K.primär författarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Benini, MilenaÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Freeman, CasaundraBerättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Nielsen, CliffOmslagmedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Panepinto, LaurenOmslagsformgivaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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The priests' lesson: beware the Nightlord, for his pleasure is a mortal's doom. My grandmother's lesson: beware love, especially with the wrong man.
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Wikipedia på engelska (2)

Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky. There, to her shock, Yeine is named an heiress to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle with cousins she never knew she had. As she fights for her life, she draws ever closer to the secrets of her mother's death and her family's bloody history.

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Medelbetyg: (3.89)
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Orbit Books

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Utgåvor: 0316043915, 0316043923

Hachette Book Group

2 utgåvor av den här boken publicerades av Hachette Book Group.

Utgåvor: 0316043915, 0316043923

 

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