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The Age of Arthur: A History of the British Isles from 350 to 650

av John Morris

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
394646,799 (3.89)4
A lifetime's scholarship enabled John Morris to recreate a past hitherto hidden in myth and mystery. He describes the Arthurian Age as 'the starting point of future British history', for it saw the transition from Roman Britain to Great Britain, the establishment of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales from the collapse of the Pax Romana. In exploring political, social, economic, religious and cultural history from the fourth to the seventh century, his theme is one of continuity. That continuity is embodied in Arthur himself: 'in name he was the last Roman Emperor, but he ruled as the first medieval king.'… (mer)
  1. 00
    Concepts of Arthur av Caitlin Green (Crypto-Willobie)
  2. 00
    King Arthur: The Truth Behind the Legend av Rodney Castleden (ed.pendragon)
    ed.pendragon: A work about the so-called Arthurian Age that stimulates and infuriates in equal degree, using evidence of varied worth from a great many disciplines -- history, archaeology, literature, folklore and placename studies, to name a few -- to create a flawed unified theory of an historical period and particularly the figure that supposedly lent his name to it.… (mer)
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The Age of Arthur by John Morris

For a man who generated a legend, folk tales and a cultural identity, and who became a defining figure in the British sense of self, surprisingly little is known of the actual Arthur, Celtic king of the fourth or fifth centuries. So little, in fact, that his name might actually have been Anglicised from the Roman Arturo.

Perhaps fortunately, this book treats of the Arthurian era in British history (defined in this work as 350 to 650 AD) rather than the life of the man himself. This was a fascinating and turbulent period as the Roman Empire fell and British consciousness of ourselves as a nation developed to fill the void left behind by the withdrawal of colonial rule from Rome. Out of the conflict that followed emerged Vortigern as overking until civil war toppled him a generation later.

In this 650-page history, those sections allotted to Arthur's rule, his military victories and frontier wars amount to just over fifty pages. The rest covers the successor states, the emergence of the Christian church and the development of society and economy within the period, all in considerable detail.

I enjoyed this book very much and found it thorough but accessible in tone. Although a long work, I felt that this was essential to do justice to the quantity of the material and it sustained my interest very effectively throughout.  ( )
  johncadamssf | Jan 9, 2020 |
In depth look at the history behind the myth of Arthur, though mostly focusing on the 'age' of the mythical king, and not the origins of the myth itself. The book is dry in parts, but well worth reading if you're interested in penetrating the mists of Britain's history. ( )
  Steve.Bivans | Jul 20, 2014 |
This book is the basic book on King Arthur as a historical personage, as far as I'm concerned (is there an acronym or that ?). While the research is now dated, it is the best book that supports or opposes the currently popular opinion about this shadowy figure. I've lived through several generations of controversy, and John Morris did a fine job of analyzing what was known at his time. A Must-read if you are going to be taken seriously in the current arguments. I have loaned and NOT received back a copy of this book. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Aug 24, 2013 |
The sixties and early seventies were an exciting time for those interested in that transitional period between the removal of Roman troops from Britain and the lowland’s transformation into England, the ‘land of the Angles’ (and Saxons, of course). Long disparaged as the ‘Dark Ages’ or the ‘lost centuries’, this Cinderella period was then becoming more acceptable to scholars to study under alternative, less romantic labels: post-Roman, Early Medieval, Late Celtic, Early Christian, Late Antiquity or Anglo-Saxon, depending on your point of view or your specialisation.

The sixties also saw the rise of popular interest in archaeology, and Leslie Alcock, director of excavations at sites such as South Cadbury in Somerset, was one of many discovering clear evidence for major activity during this period in Wales and the West, not least at South Cadbury itself, dubbed Camelot because of its ‘Arthurian’ finds. Alcock also published an archaeological and historical overview of the period called, significantly, Arthur’s Britain (1971), in which he made a tentative case for the existence of a Dark Age warlord called Arthur. The legendary figure was lending his aura to the current zeitgeist, appealing to a range of opinions from highbrow through middlebrow to lowbrow, from students through Romantics to New Agers.

In the wake of this Dr John Morris, a senior lecturer at UCL, published his monumental The Age of Arthur, the synthesis of years of study in Late Antiquity – as the closing centuries of the Later Roman Empire were often described – and its aftermath. His wide interests, learning and experience (which ranged from army service to socialism, from academic work in India to pacifism) made him an interesting candidate to attempt a syncretised survey of Late Antiquity in the British Isles, which incidentally for him included Ireland and Brittany. Marshalling a huge mass of documents and references to material culture he put together an unprecedentedly detailed history of Britain over three centuries, exactly that timescale that had traditionally been called the Dark Ages. Unfortunately he entitled his tome The Age of Arthur.

Alcock had received some criticism for the title of his book, which appeared two years before Morris’, but at least he tried to argue from the evidence he presented. Morris didn’t. His approach was in many ways similar to the popular histories of an earlier time where much was erected on sometimes flimsy evidence, dubiously interpreted and stated with no uncertain authority. Quite apart from extraordinary new narratives – such as a complex military campaign across South Wales which nobody else has ever detailed, before or since – he continually referenced his own Arthurian Sources which had yet to be published and which thus made it impossible for the general reader to validate his claims. His colleagues, however, were not so easily hoodwinked, and he was critically crucified for it. The core of his narrative was the reconstructed career of the unquestionably historical Arthur, an undertaking which in many ways was the counterpart of an earlier counterfactual history from eight centuries before, Geoffrey of Monmouth’s notorious History of the Kings of Britain. And like that earlier historical fabricator from disparate sources Morris was laughed out of court.

John Morris survived just four years after the publication of The Age of Arthur in 1973, sadly long enough to see his reputation crumble amongst his peers following the appearance of this work. Much of the evidence for his arguments was to appear in his Arthurian Sources series, but he died long before these were ready for publication. What was eventually published was barely the ghost of what he must have intended, but even so enough survives to show that his methodology – using his undoubted scholarship to plaster over the cracks of diverse and often uncertain evidence to suggest a sound structure – was ultimately flawed.

The Age of Arthur, if read at all for enlightenment, should be used with caution and with some prior knowledge and understanding of the limitations of the available evidence. Four decades of archaeological and other research mean that many of his ex cathedra statements have regretfully to be disregarded. Sadly that hasn’t stopped some enthusiastic disciples, such as Rodney Castleden, from claiming his throne, alas with rather less erudition.

http://wp.me/s2oNj1-age ( )
  ed.pendragon | Aug 1, 2013 |
Interesting historical thesis of the transition from roman rule in Britain and the exploration of why dispite the fact that much of the western empire was occupied politically/miltary by "barbariens" the cultural etc breaks with the past was greatest in Britain. The long resistence of the british to the english left them welsh and the english with a civil society that had local authonomy and strong sense of the rights of the indvidual and the roots of a national identity ( )
  ablueidol | Nov 5, 2006 |
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Dr. Morris, however, has not only surveyed the whole period and the whole of the British Isles across these three centuries, but has injected into every fibre of his book his own individualistic views and uncompromising conclusions. He writes with nothing if not zest and character and there will probably be few who have not learnt something from him at some time, if only as a reaction to one of his pronouncements. Unfortunately, the authoritative tone of this volume conceals not a lack of knowledge as such but a seemingly total inability to construct a thesis which unfolds logically and by appropriate stages, together with an indifference to the views and conclusions of other scholars bordering on the absolute. It is a matter of deep regret that such an outwardly impressive piece of scholarship as The Age of Arthur should crumble upon inspection into a tangled tissue of fact and fantasy which is both misleading and misguided. It is also a matter of grave concern that this book is likely to be read widely and its conclusions disseminated at all levels. No scholarly satisfaction is to be derived from commenting unfavourably and at length on the labour of love of another historian, but this massive edifice needs so thoroughly dismantling that it is essential to treat, at least in passing, as many as possible (for even a more extended critique cannot cover every defective statement) of the errors and misconceptions with which it abounds.
tillagd av Cynfelyn | ändraStudia celtica, vol. x-xi (1975-6), pp. 454-486, D. P. Kirby & J. E. Caerwyn Williams
 
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A lifetime's scholarship enabled John Morris to recreate a past hitherto hidden in myth and mystery. He describes the Arthurian Age as 'the starting point of future British history', for it saw the transition from Roman Britain to Great Britain, the establishment of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales from the collapse of the Pax Romana. In exploring political, social, economic, religious and cultural history from the fourth to the seventh century, his theme is one of continuity. That continuity is embodied in Arthur himself: 'in name he was the last Roman Emperor, but he ruled as the first medieval king.'

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