HemGrupperDiskuteraUtforskaTidsandan
Sök igenom hela webbplatsen
Sista chansen att delta i SantaThing måndag kl 18 svensk tid. Klicka här!
avfärda
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

Reflections on the Revolution In Europe:…
Laddar...

Reflections on the Revolution In Europe: Immigration, Islam, and the West (utgåvan 2009)

av Christopher Caldwell

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
268578,477 (3.53)2
Europe has undergone a demographic revolution it never expected. A half century of mass immigration has failed to produce anything resembling a melting pot. By overestimating its need for immigrant labor and underestimating the culture-shaping potential of religion, Europe has trapped itself in a problem to which it has no obvious solution. Journalist Christopher Caldwell reveals a paradox: since World War II, mass immigration has been made possible by Europe's enforcement of secularism, tolerance, and equality. But when immigrants arrive, they are not required to adopt those values--and they are disinclined to. Muslims dominate or nearly dominate important European cities. As increasingly assertive immigrant populations shape the continent, Caldwell writes, the foundations of European culture and civilization are being challenged--and replaced.--From publisher description.… (mer)
Medlem:BorrowOurBooks
Titel:Reflections on the Revolution In Europe: Immigration, Islam, and the West
Författare:Christopher Caldwell
Info:Doubleday (2009), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 432 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:December 2009

Verksinformation

Reflections on the Revolution In Europe: Immigration, Islam, and the West av Christopher Caldwell

Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 2 omnämnanden

Visar 5 av 5
I have read one chapter of this book. I am not finishing it because as best I can tell, it continues to be an obnoxious, stomach-turning screed against not just Islam, but diversity in general, and I have better things to do with my time. ( )
  GaylaBassham | May 27, 2018 |
I have read one chapter of this book. I am not finishing it because as best I can tell, it continues to be an obnoxious, stomach-turning screed against not just Islam, but diversity in general, and I have better things to do with my time. ( )
  gayla.bassham | Nov 7, 2016 |
This reviewer has spent the last 30 years living in one of the prime destination countries of Arab Moslem immigration (Spain) and also one of their prime destination areas within that country (the Levante), so it's interesting to compare what's happening here with the account in Caldwell's book.

He mostly seems to get it right.

There are obviously many more North Africans living in the area than 30 years ago and they really do form a parallel society. They don't have problems with the local population (in this area half Spanish and half northern European residents) but equally they have very little social contact outside their group. The motive for the immigration seems to be mostly economic, to escape arbitrary and corrupt North African governments plus to take advantage of generous Spanish social services and free education. The idea seems to be to build a better Morocco in Spain with Spain being seen as a sort of Paradise on Earth (confirmed by Laila Lalami's interesting book "Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits" - giving the rare Moroccan immigrant viewpoint).

Religion is getting stronger, not weaker. More head scarves, more beards and the non-integration is very noticeable with Arab women not working (i.e. not becoming more European) and having many more children than the local Spanish and also being very cognisant of their rights to healthcare, social services and schooling. Basically they seem to be a very happy group of people, with little money and no political pretensions (a low economic profile and non-existent political interest) who aren't planning to integrate and become Spaniards but who intend to live here permanently.

So, at a basic level Caldwell's question, "Can Europe be the same with different people in it?" is valid, and the answer seems to be a qualified "No" as Moslem immigrants aren't planning to integrate, intermarry and become first loyalty Spanish/ French/ Swedish etc. The qualification may be that small percentages of non-integrating immigrants don't seem to make much difference and they aren't (at present) seeking political power.

One problem with the book may be that the author doesn't spend much time on other writing concerning race/religion and majority/minority political power. If he had, an obvious 20th Century point of reference would have been German National Socialism from the 1920's and 30's. In, "Hitler's Table Talk"(conversation 109), Hitler is recorded as saying, "In the old Austria, nothing could be done without patronage. That's partly explained by the fact that nine million Germans were in fact rulers, in virtue of an unwritten law, of fifty million non-Germans. This German ruling class took strict care that places should always be found for Germans. For them this was the only method of maintaining themselves in this privileged situation.".

This doesn't describe the Moslem minority in Europe but it's a good description of the Jewish ethic/religious minority on the U.S. who make major efforts of patronage to gain and hold powerful economic and political positions for their group (e.g. the Federal Reserve, Treasury, Media, lobbies etc.).

So, it's a worthwhile book, but I'm not expecting the author to write anything about the more relevant subject of Jewish racial patronage in the U.S. (Title? Reflections on the Revolution in America. Can America be the same with different people in it?). On this subject the "daring" author will likely turn wobbly and engage in, "the pre-emptive grovelling that characterizes most writing about matters touching on ethnicity". ( )
  Miro | May 10, 2015 |
A detailed, painstaking and painful review of how the massive islamic immigration to Europe over the past half century has challenged and successfuly subverted traditional western values of freedom of speech, gender equality and rule of law. The book, at 349 pages, often fails to adequately cover the issues it attempts to address. But it accuraely confronts the threat to western values and freedoms presented by political Islam. ( )
1 rösta DanielMaddison | Mar 25, 2010 |
This is a good summary of the cataclysmic changes that are taking place in Europe. Based on immigration patterns and child-bearing statistics Europe will be Islamic in the not-too-distant future which portends ill for the U.S. to have allies in the region. As Europe goes, so will go the U.S., unless we are alert to the warnings heading our way from Europe.

Enoch Powell (pp. 4-7) first warned Europe in 1968 about the coming crisis of Muslim immigration into Europe. He stated that Europe must be mad "to be permitting the annual inflow of some 50,000 dependents (p. 5)." Powell was correct.

Ernest Renan warned in 1883:

"Those liberals who defend Islam do not know Islam. Islam is the seamless union of the spiritual and the temporal, it is the reign of dogma, it is the heaviest chain mankind has ever borne. In the early Middle Ages, Islam tolerated philosophy, because it could not stop it. It could not stop it because it was as yet disorganized, and poorly armed for terror. . . . But as soon as Islam had a mass of ardent believers at its disposal, it destroyed everything in its path. Religious terror and hypocrisy were the order of the day. Islam has been liberal when weak, and violent when strong. Let us not give it credit for what it was merely unable to suppress (p. 114)."

Likewise, Hilaire Belloc noted in 1938 that Westerners:

"have forgotten all about Islam. They have never come in contact with it. They take for granted that it is decaying, and that , anyway, it is just a foreign religion which will not concern them. It is, as a fact, the most formidable and persistent enemy which our civilization has had, and may at any moment become as large a menace in the future as it has been in the past. . . . . It has always seemed to me possible, and even probable, that there would be a resurrection of Islam and that our sons or our grandsons would see the renewal of that tremendous struggle between the Christian culture and what has been for more than a thousand years its greatest opponent (p. 112)."

Central to this important, but neglected strain in the European tradition, has been Benedict XVI. Whereas John Paul sought dialogue, Benedict does not (p. 185). Western secularists and believers have more in common since they both share the Western intellectual heritage. These individuals agree that Christianity is the "ultimate foundation of liberty, conscience, human rights, and democracy" (p. 186). Juergen Habermas summarizes this important point: "We continue to nourish ourselves from this source. Everything else is postmodern chatter (p. 186)."

Secularists, and Benedict, agree that reasoning, modern people "had a natural home in Christianity (p. 187)."

Benedict had actually elaborated on his points already in: Pera, Marcello, and Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger. Without Roots: The West, Relativism, Christianity, Islam. New York: Basic Books, 2006.

The contemporary Islamic world is well represented by Tariq Ramadan. According to Caldwell, "As soon as the practice of Islam is constrained, the social contract is null and void. Muslims' acceptance of the European countries in which they live can only ever be provisional, contingent on Europe's willingness to give Islam free rein. The integration of Muslims into Europe will happen on Muslim term . . . . Only when Europe's ways are understood as Islam's will Muslims obey them. And if not, not (p. 298)." Caldwell summarizes: "What Islam will contribute to the West is Islam (p. 299)."

This book deserves a wider reading.
2 rösta gmicksmith | Oct 23, 2009 |
Visar 5 av 5
In a week in which the European election results have shown the potency of the anti-immigrant vote in many countries, including Britain, Christopher Caldwell's contention that immigration has not only changed Europe but revolutionised it has a topical plausibility. Immigration, he says, and above all Muslim immigration, has planted in the heart of a weak and confused civilisation communities, rapidly growing in number, that have already changed Europe to suit their needs and beliefs. And the chances are, he insists, that in the future we will bend to their will rather than that they will bend to ours.

Rightwing rubbish? Caldwell cannot be so easily dismissed. True, he is a luminary of the Weekly Standard, the American neoconservative magazine Rupert Murdoch finances, but he is one of its more urbane and interesting voices. He knows Europe, especially France, better than most American and British commentators. His columns in the Financial Times frequently dispense a sharp common sense that many liberals find salutary, although not all might say so. He is very good at pinpointing denial and flight from reality, less good at offering convincing and practical alternatives.

Where he is right is in underlining the fact that immigration was encouraged by elites who took a ludicrously short-sighted view of its costs and consequences. The idea was to prop up industries already in decline and, later, to staff industries, such as health and tourism, the full cost of which our societies refused (and continue to refuse) to pay. The manning of underpaid and menial positions could be maintained only by a constant influx of new migrants, since people in established migrant communities either got better jobs or chose, like many in the native white population, to depend on the welfare state and to have no jobs at all. More recently, immigration has been defended as a way of making up for falling birth rates when, as Caldwell points out, it would have to be multiplied an unfeasibly large number of times to have that effect.

This inherently unstable and dysfunctional system was set in motion, in other words, for no good reason. Those who started it off did not foresee how big it would become, nor the mechanisms of family reunion and arranged marriages that would drive it on even when restrictions were belatedly imposed. Most of them did not imagine, says Caldwell, that the newcomers would "retain the habits and cultures of southern villages, clans, marketplaces, and mosques".

Either that, or they welcomed such retention. It was right and proper that the people Europe had lorded over should now come to the metropolitan countries: they would change us for the better. Not only were all cultures equal, but their cultures were more equal than ours. Caldwell quotes the philosopher Pierre-André Taguieff, who uses the term "immigrationisme" to describe the position that immigration is both inevitable and good. The truth is that immigration was not inevitable on the scale on which it took place, and that its effects have ranged from the pleasing - more ethnic food - to the positive - more cultural diversity - to the truly terrible - race riots, social tension, terrorist attacks.

Caldwell is good on the distorting effect of the universalist code that European politicians and intellectuals impose on discussion of immigration and the making of policy about it. Thus immigration is too often treated as one thing - as if New Zealand computer experts, American bankers and Polish plumbers fell into the same category as villagers from Pakistani Kashmir. Thus any trouble in immigrant communities must be understood in terms of alienation and exclusion, never in terms of aggression. Thus any restriction of rights must be cast within a general framework, so that, for instance, in order to ban headscarves from schools, the French government had to ban yarmulkes and "large crosses" as well, a transparent rigmarole.

When the Danish cartoons furore was at its height, newspapers the length and breadth of Europe upheld the right of free speech - yet the vast majority of them somehow neglected to reprint the offending sketches. The code insists, says Caldwell, that Islam must always be defined as a peaceful religion, yet ignores the way in which Muslim leaders in Europe lay down red lines that the non-Muslim majority is not supposed to cross. Once Muslim majorities emerge in certain towns and areas, Muslims will demand the right to live not only differently, but also separately, and Europe will lose control, Caldwell believes, of significant chunks of its territory. He ignores, in this worrying forecast, the diversity of Islam in Europe, and the often hidden ways in which Muslims in Europe are changing, as well as the strength of the secular European reaction if such developments threatened to become reality. One might reflect on the anxiety over black immigration a generation ago, and note how overdone it turned out to be.

It is not Islam's strength, however, that is at the core of Caldwell's analysis, but Europe's weakness. Like others of neoconservative bent, he has a Spenglerian sense that Europe has lost its sense of purpose. His book, one has to say, is not sure in the end of its own purpose. Is it a call for Europeans to look clear-sightedly at what immigration has wreaked and, in particular, to resist the overweening demands of some Muslims? Or is it a despairing commentary on the weakness of a Europe that has lost the capacity to do so?

But he is right to argue that immigration on the scale that Europe has experienced constitutes a risky experiment to which we need not have submitted ourselves, and of which the final result is not yet clear. He is right that we frequently talk about it in stupid and dishonest ways. If his book sharpens a so far sluggish debate, it will have served an important purpose.
 
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Viktiga platser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Motto
Dedikation
Inledande ord
Citat
Avslutande ord
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På omslaget citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Kanonisk DDC/MDS
Kanonisk LCC

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska (2)

Europe has undergone a demographic revolution it never expected. A half century of mass immigration has failed to produce anything resembling a melting pot. By overestimating its need for immigrant labor and underestimating the culture-shaping potential of religion, Europe has trapped itself in a problem to which it has no obvious solution. Journalist Christopher Caldwell reveals a paradox: since World War II, mass immigration has been made possible by Europe's enforcement of secularism, tolerance, and equality. But when immigrants arrive, they are not required to adopt those values--and they are disinclined to. Muslims dominate or nearly dominate important European cities. As increasingly assertive immigrant populations shape the continent, Caldwell writes, the foundations of European culture and civilization are being challenged--and replaced.--From publisher description.

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Populära omslag

Snabblänkar

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (3.53)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5 1
3 6
3.5 1
4 12
4.5
5 5

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 164,358,776 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig