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The Lacuna av Barbara Kingsolver
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The Lacuna (utgåvan 2009)

av Barbara Kingsolver (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygDiskussioner / Omnämnanden
4,7032421,772 (3.87)1 / 617
"The story of Harrison William Shepherd, a man caught between two worlds -- Mexico and the United States in the 1930s, '40s, and '50s -- and whose search for identity takes readers to the heart of the twentieth century's most tumultuous events"--Provided by publisher.
Medlem:aspiereads
Titel:The Lacuna
Författare:Barbara Kingsolver (Författare)
Info:Faber & Faber (2009), Edition: Later printing, 532 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

The Lacuna av Barbara Kingsolver

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    The Poisonwood Bible av Barbara Kingsolver (GreenVelvet)
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    The Bean Trees | Animal Dreams | Pigs in Heaven av Barbara Kingsolver (readerbabe1984)
  3. 40
    Kärlek het som chili av Laura Esquivel (Anonym användare)
    Anonym användare: It is set in Mexico and deals, obliquely and amusingly, with women's rights.
  4. 10
    Varför vara lycklig när du kan vara normal? av Jeanette Winterson (KayCliff)
    KayCliff: Both books feature a lonely, gay child growing up, finding salvation in books.
  5. 10
    The Years with Laura Díaz av Carlos Fuentes (charlie68)
    charlie68: Another Novel with Frida Kahlo as a character.
  6. 10
    Any Human Heart av William Boyd (lizchris)
    lizchris: A fictional character who encounters real people from history across their lifetime.
  7. 11
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engelska (241)  franska (1)  Alla språk (242)
Visa 1-5 av 242 (nästa | visa alla)
In these short minutes after reading the first book that kept calling me back after months of quite the literary lull, I am drained and perhaps a little weepy. What can I say. I love Barbara Kingsolver, which is no news to anyone who knows me. And I now love Harrison Shepherd. This is heartbreak I feel when reading The Glass Menagerie. Whatever it is, I know it when it flushes through my bones and strings them together. And makes me have no idea how to adequately, concisely, and coherently say what I want to say. Here are some chunks of thought.

As I get older, I become less and less inclined to read synopses on the jackets/back covers of books before I read the book itself, and all I really knew about this one was that it somehow involved the whole Kahlo-Rivera-Trotsky lusty and political menage a trois. As much as I love Kingsolver, I was holding my breath, crossing my fingers that wasn't too lofty a goal to pull off, even for her. I was able to let go...her portrayal seemed so effortless and...normal(?) to me. These are three distinct figures, no doubt about that, and BK makes sure the reader knows it, but at the same time she portrayed them in a way that I could easily separate my prior notions of them to their roles in this novel. Primarily because, really, it's all about Harrison. We learn about the world as he learns through the people he cherishes (which might be the whole world). By the second half of the book, those three are nearly forgotten (only that the tragedy has everything to do with his connection to them). This really was two books.

"'Soli, let me tell you. The most important thing about a person is always the thing you don't know.'"

Frida says this to Harrison midway through the novel, but it's been true since the beginning and remains true through the very end. Silence and hearsay--that's all there seems to be. It's the most confounding and comforting sentiment, roiling my brain for the past several days, for all the good and harm it does to the characters in this novel and the world in which we live. Where should trust be placed and what/who is worth believing? How can you tell? Shit. I don't know.

And why do humans feel compelled to continuously strive to find a source to direct their hatred? Fear, yes, I know...I feel so naive, but it's just so hard to wrap my head around it sometimes and it makes me nauseous. The HUAC hearings and the culture that it grew out of and that grew out of it have always pushed a button in me moreso than many other, more grievous crimes perpetrated in this world, and I'm not entirely sure why. This only makes me realize further that I live in a safe little bubble, or that even the safest of little bubbles can be burst.

I came to love Harrison like a brother or son. This was the strongest attachment I've felt to any one character I've read in a long time. I wanted to be his protectorate. His naivete sometimes got to be too infuriating (at first I wondered if this was a flaw in the writing, but then I forgot to remember that this was just a story). And there was just no good answer to his isolation. The way he found such courage in Lev's struggle, but could hardly deal when he was vilified himself. He was just one of those people...you know how you might be living your life with maybe not everything, but enough, and things are OK for you, but there's someone--a friend, a family member, could even be someone you know that you're not even necessarily close to--but in your gut you can feel them to be really GOOD people and you just want something GOOD to work out for them at least once in their life? That's how I feel about Harrison. I hope he was able to find it.

My head is pounding, and I've got to dream about what I can read next. Until next time, amen. ( )
  LibroLindsay | Jun 18, 2021 |
Complex book. The beginning was slow for me, there are many spanish words intermingled, as the story begins in Mexico. Most spanish words are explained, but not all. As our protagonist, a young boy in the beginning (Mexico) matures, he is involved with so many interesting people through work that he has learned to do, cooking mostly. He is a writer by nature. Once in the U.S., (he has citizenship in both countries, Mexican mother and American Dad) he is a young man looking for work and eventually begins writing novels which are well received in the states. It is a complex story as the relationships are deep and meaningful, the story intertwines Mexican and U.S. politics and so much more. You will not be disappointed. ( )
  mcorbink | Jan 12, 2021 |
I always enjoy stories that fit within a particular time period and give snit bits of history. For that reason, I enjoyed her retelling of Diego Riveria, Frieda, Trotsky, and the paranoia of America during that time period. But I felt this story carried on. Ultimately, it did not have the compelling story-telling that I had hoped for. ( )
  nrt43 | Dec 29, 2020 |
I generally love Barbara Kingsolver's novels, but this one didn't keep my interest. I enjoyed the diary format, but hated the interruptions from the archivist. For me it was more the subject matter and time period. It wasn't good enough to keep my attention. I didn't finish it. ( )
  3CatMom | Dec 28, 2020 |
A worthwhile read that brought to life what it was like living through the Depression, WWII and into the 1950s.
I've liked other books by this author. Her style and word choice make for enjoyable reading.
The author gets the perspective of the narrator right. That perspective changes in a realistic way as the boy matures. The action flags in the middle but it picks up again. ( )
  helenar238 | Oct 31, 2020 |
Visa 1-5 av 242 (nästa | visa alla)
Kingsolver, at the top of her craft, builds pyramids of language and scenic highways through mountains of facts, while plotting a mostly tight course through the fictional premises that convey her writing’s social conscience. In this book, pacifism, social justice, and free expression are the standards she shoulders.
tillagd av Shortride | ändraBookforum, Celia McGee (Dec 1, 2009)
 
“The Lacuna” can be enjoyed sheerly for the music of its passages on nature, archaeology, food and friendship; or for its portraits of real and invented people; or for its harmonious choir of voices. But the fuller value of Kingsolver’s novel lies in its call to conscience and connection.
 
Barbara Kingsolver's new novel, "The Lacuna," is the most mature and ambitious one she's written during her celebrated 20-year career, but it's also her most demanding. Spanning three decades, the story comes to us as a collection of diary entries and memoir, punctuated by archivist's notes, newspaper articles, letters, book reviews and congressional transcripts involving some of the 20th century's most radical figures. The sweetness that leavened "The Bean Trees" and "Animal Dreams" has been burned away, and the lurid melodrama that enlivened "The Poisonwood Bible" has been replaced by the cool realism of a narrator who feels permanently alienated from the world.
 
A serious problem with The Lacuna is telegraphed in its striking title. "Lacuna" refers to a gap or something that's absent. The motif of the crucial missing piece runs throughout the novel, but the thing unintentionally missing here is an engaging main character. Our hero, Harrison Shepherd, is an accidental onlooker to history buffeted by other people's plans and passions.
 
Narrated in the form of letters, diary entries and newspaper clippings, the novel takes a while to get going, but once it does, it achieves a rare dramatic power that reaches its emotional peak when Harrison wittily and eloquently defends himself before the House Un-American Activities Committee (on the panel is a young Dick Nixon). Employed by the American imagination, is how one character describes Harrison, a term that could apply equally to Kingsolver as she masterfully resurrects a dark period in American history with the assured hand of a true literary artist.
tillagd av khuggard | ändraPublishers Weekly
 
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A novel! Why do you say this won't liberate anyone? Where does any man go to be free, whether he is poor or rich or even in prison? To Dostoyevsky! To Gogol!
The most important thing about a person is always the thing you don't know.
Does a man become a revolutionary out of the belief he’s entitled to joy rather than submission?
The Painter took a book down to show it off: a codex. Made a hundred years ago by monks, who laboured to make exact replicas of the ancient books the Mexica people made on thick tree-bark paper. It didn't have pages exactly, but was one long folded paper like an accordion. The ancient language is pictures, little figures. He said it was the Codex Boturini, about the peregrinations of the Azteca.... The long page was divided into two hundred fourteen small boxes, each one recording the main thing that happened in that year.... Small, inked footprints trailed down the full length of the book, the sad black tracks of heartache.
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"The story of Harrison William Shepherd, a man caught between two worlds -- Mexico and the United States in the 1930s, '40s, and '50s -- and whose search for identity takes readers to the heart of the twentieth century's most tumultuous events"--Provided by publisher.

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