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The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol. 1: Mainly Mechanics, Radiation, and Heat (1963)

av Richard P. Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, Matthew Sands

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Serier: The Feynman Lectures on Physics (1)

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1,062519,705 (4.62)1
T[hese] books [are] based upon a course of lectures in introductory physics given by Prof. R.P. Feynman at the California Institute of Technology during the academic year 1961-1962; it covers the first year of the two year introductory course taken by all Caltech freshmen and sophormores, and was followed in 1962-63 by a similar series covering the second year.… (mer)
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My son saw me reading this last month, looked at the page full of differential equations, and remarked, "Some light reading, Dad?" Well, actually, yes! So much here! in an introductory course! That every student at Cal Tech, regardless of major, was required to take these classes is amazing. And if I had Feynman as my instructor, with this as the intro, I think my life would have be quite different. Not that my professor, Dr. V. V. Raman, whose grandfather won a Nobel, was a slouch, but this had meat and my freshman class had basics of simplified mechanics. I changed majors a few times, dropped out, eventually went back and became a mechanical engineer and I've never lost the love of this stuff (and am happy with my life). And this is definitely something I should have read long ago. It's a long read now - Vol 2 is even longer and I expect to stretch it out over next year as I did this one for 2023. The narrative is infectious and you can feel the excitement that Feynman had, and conveyed, for the material.

Feynman is eminently quotable. A sampling:

[on actually measuring positions of planets and how they moved]
This was a tremendous idea—that to find something out, it is better to perform some careful experiments than to carry on deep philosophical arguments.
{This is the idea. Philosphers tend to ask questions with no answers (although some of them think they come up with answers). Science looks for answers to real questions.}

[Universal gravitation]
This phenomenon showed that light does not travel instantaneously, and furnished the first estimate of the speed of light. This was done in 1676.

[on precision of definition]
Perhaps you say, “That’s a terrible thing—I learned that in science we have to define everything precisely.” We cannot define anything precisely! If we attempt to, we get into that paralysis of thought that comes to philosophers, who sit opposite each other, one saying to the other, “You don’t know what you are talking about!” The second one says, “What do you mean by know? What do you mean by talking? What do you mean by you?,” and so on.
{Love it!}

[more on philosophers]
...what is an object? Philosophers are always saying, “Well, just take a chair for example.” The moment they say that, you know that they do not know what they are talking about any more. What is a chair? Well, a chair is a certain thing over there … certain?, how certain? ”
{45 years I've been saying they don't know what they are talking about...}

[on relativity]
Poincaré made the following statement of the principle of relativity: “According to the principle of relativity, the laws of physical phenomena must be the same for a fixed observer as for an observer who has a uniform motion of translation relative to him, so that we have not, nor can we possibly have, any means of discerning whether or not we are carried along in such a motion.”

[on cocktail party philosophers]
When this idea descended upon the world, it caused a great stir among philosophers, particularly the “cocktail-party philosophers,” who say, “Oh, it is very simple: Einstein’s theory says all is relative!” In fact, a surprisingly large number of philosophers, not only those found at cocktail parties (but rather than embarrass them, we shall just call them “cocktail-party philosophers”), will say, “That all is relative is a consequence of Einstein, and it has profound influences on our ideas.””

[on notation]
We could, of course, use any notation we want; do not laugh at notations; invent them, they are powerful. In fact, mathematics is, to a large extent, invention of better notations. ( )
  Razinha | Nov 21, 2023 |
Indeholder "Feynman's Preface", "Foreword by Robert B. Leighton", "Chapter 1. Atoms in Motion", " 1.1 Introduction", " 1.2 Matter is made of atoms", " 1.3 Atomic processes", " 1.4 Chemical reactions", "Chapter 2. Basic Physics", " 2.1 Introduction", " 2.2 Physics before 1920", " 2.3 Quantum physics", " 2.4 Nuclei and particles", "Chapter 3. The Relation of Physics to Other Sciences", " 3.1 Introduction", " 3.2 Chemistry", " 3.3 Biology", " 3.4 Astronomy", " 3.5 Geology", " 3.6 Psychology", " 3.7 How did it get that way?", "Chapter 4. Conservation of Energy", " 4.1 What is energy?", " 4.2 Gravitational potential energy", " 4.3 Kinetic energy", " 4.4 Other forms of energy", "Chapter 5. Time and Distance", " 5.1 Motion", " 5.2 Time", " 5.3 Short times", " 5.4 Long times", " 5.5 Units and standards of time", " 5.6 Large distances", " 5.7 Short distances", "Chapter 6. Probability", " 6.1 Chance and likelihood", " 6.2 Fluctuations", " 6.3 The random walk", " 6.4 A probability distribution", " 6.5 The uncertainty principle", "Chapter 7. The Theory of Gravitation", " 7.1 Planetary motions", " 7.2 Kepler's laws", " 7.3 Development of dynamics", " 7.4 Newton's law of gravitation", " 7.5 Universal gravitation", " 7.6 Cavendish's experiment", " 7.7 What is gravity?", " 7.8 Gravity and relativity", "Chapter 8. Motion", " 8.1 Description of Motion", " 8.2 Speed", " 8.3 Speed as a derivative", " 8.4 Distance as an integral", " 8.5 Acceleration", "Chapter 9. Newton's Laws of Dynamics", " 9.1 Momentum and force", " 9.2 Speed and velocity", " 9.3 Components of velocity, acceleration, and force", " 9.4 What is the force?", " 9.5 Meaning of the dynamical equations", " 9.6 Numerical solution of the equations", " 9.7 Planetary motions", "Chapter 10. Conservation of Momentum", " 10.1 Newton's Third Law", " 10.2 Conservation of momentum", " 10.3 Momentum is conserved!", " 10.4 Momentum and energy", " 10.5 Relativistic momentum", "Chapter 11. Vectors", " 11.1 Symmetry in physics", " 11.2 Translations", " 11.3 Rotations", " 11.4 Vectors", " 11.5 Vector algebra", " 11.6 Newton's laws in vector rotation", " 11.7 Scalar product of vectors", "Chapter 12. Characteristics of Force", " 12.1 What is a force?", " 12.2 Friction", " 12.3 Molecular forces", " 12.4 Fundamental forces. Fields", " 12.5 Pseudo forces", " 12.6 Nuclear forces", "Chapter 13. Work and Potential Energy (A)", " 13.1 Energy of a falling body", " 13.2 Work done by gravity", " 13.3 Summation of energy", " 13.4 Gravitational field of large objects", "Chapter 14. Work and Potential Energy (conclusion)", " 14.1 Work", " 14.2 Constrained motion", " 14.3 Conservative forces", " 14.4 Nonconservative forces", " 14.5 Potentials and fields", "Chapter 15. The Special Theory of Relativity", " 15.1 The principle of relativity", " 15.2 The Lorentz transformation", " 15.3 The Michelson-Morley experiment", " 15.4 Transformation of time", " 15.5 The Lorentz contraction", " 15.6 Simultaneity", " 15.7 Four-vectors", " 15.8 Relativistic dynamics", " 15.9 Equivalence of mass and energy", "Chapter 16. Relativistic Energy and Momentum", " 16.1 Relativity and the philosophers", " 16.2 The twin paradox", " 16.3 Transformation of velocities", " 16.4 Relativistic mass", " 16.5 Relativistic energy", "Chapter 17. Space-Time", " 17.1 The geometry of space-time", " 17.2 Space-time intervals", " 17.3 Past, present and future", " 17.4 More about four-vectors", " 17.5 Four-vector algebra", "Chapter 18. Rotation in Two Dimensions", " 18.1 The center of mass", " 18.2 Rotation of a rigid body", " 18.3 Angular momentum", " 18.4 Conservation of angular momentum", "Chapter 19. Center of Mass; Moment of Inertia", " 19.1 Properties of the center of mass", " 19.2 Locating the center of mass", " 19.3 Finding the moment of inertia", " 19.4 Rotational kinetic energy", "Chapter 20. Rotation in Space", " 20.1 Torques in three dimensions", " 20.2 The rotation equations using cross products", " 20.3 The gyroscope", " 20.4 Angular momentum of a solid body", "Chapter 21. The Harmonic Oscillator", " 21.1 Linear differential equations", " 21.2 The harmonic oscillator", " 21.3 Harmonic motion and circular motion", " 21.4 Initial conditions", " 21.5 Forced oscillations", "Chapter 22. Algebra", " 22.1 Addition and multiplication", " 22.2 The inverse operations", " 22.3 Abstraction and generalization", " 22.4 Approximating irrational numbers", " 22.5 Complex numbers", " 22.6 Imaginary exponents", "Chapter 23. Resonance", " 23.1 Complex numbers and harmonic motion", " 23.2 The forced oscillator with damping", " 23.3 Electrical resonance", " 23.4 Resonance in nature", "Chapter 24. Transients", " 24.1 The energy of an oscillator", " 24.2 Damped oscillators", " 24.3 Electrical transients", "Chapter 25. Linear Systems and Review", " 25.1 Linear differential equations", " 25.2 Superposition of solutions", " 25.3 Oscillations in linear systems", " 25.4 Analogs in physics", " 25.5 Series and parallel impedances", "Chapter 26. Optics: The Principle of Least Time", " 26.1 Light", " 26.2 Relection and refraction", " 26.3 Fermat's principle of least time", " 26.4 Applications of Fermat's principle", " 26.5 A more precise statement of Fermat's principle", " 26.6 How it works", "Chapter 27. Geometrical Optics", " 27.1 Introduction", " 27.2 The focal length of a spherical surface", " 27.3 The focal length of a lens", " 27.4 Magnification", " 27.5 Compound lenses", " 27.6 Aberrations", " 27.7 Resolving power", "Chapter 28. Electromagnetic Radiation", " 28.1 Electromagnetism", " 28.2 Radiation", " 28.3 The dipole radiator", " 28.4 Interference", "Chapter 29. Interference", " 29.1 Electromagnetics waves", " 29.2 Energy of radiation", " 29.3 Sinusoidal waves", " 29.4 Two dipole radiators", " 29.5 The mathematics of interference", "Chapter 30. Diffraction", " 30.1 The resultant amplitude due to n equal oscillators", " 30.2 The diffraction grating", " 30.3 Resolving power of a grating", " 30.4 The parabolic antenna", " 30.5 Colored films; crystals", " 30.6 Diffraction by opaque screens", " 30.7 The field of a plane of oscillating charges", "Chapter 31. The Origin of the Refractive Index", " 31.1 The index of refraction", " 31.2 The field due to the material", " 31.3 Dispersion", " 31.4 Absorption", " 31.5 The energy carried by an electric wave", " 31.6 Diffraction of light by a screen", "Chapter 32. Radiation Damping. Light Scattering", " 32.1 Radiation resistance", " 32.2 The rate of radiation of energy", " 32.3 Radiation damping", " 32.4 Independent sources", " 32.5 Scattering of light", "Chapter 33. Polarization", " 33.1 The electric vector of light", " 33.2 Polarization of scattered light", " 33.3 Birefringence", " 33.4 Polarizers", " 33.5 Optical activity", " 33.6 The intensity of reflected light", " 33.7 Anomalous refraction", "Chapter 34. Relativistic Effects in Radiation", " 34.1 Moving sources", " 34.2 Finding the 'apparent' motion", " 34.3 Synchrotron radiation", " 34.4 Cosmic synchrotron radiation", " 34.5 Bremsstrahlung", " 34.6 The Doppler effect", " 34.7 The w, k four-vector", " 34.8 Aberration", " 34.9 The momentum of light", "Chapter 35. Color Vision", " 35.1 The human eye", " 35.2 Color depends on intensity", " 35.3 Measuring the color sensation", " 35.4 The chromaticity diagram", " 35.5 The mechanism of color vision", " 35.6 Physiochemistry of color vision", "Chapter 36. Mechanisms of Seeing", " 36.1 The sensation of color", " 36.2 The physiology of the eye", " 36.3 The rod celss", " 36.4 The compound (insect) eye", " 36.5 Other eyes", " 36.6 Neurology of vision", "Chapter 37. Quantum Behavior", " 37.1 Atomic mechanics", " 37.2 An experiment with bullets", " 37.3 An experiment with waves", " 37.4 An experiment with electrons", " 37.5 The interference of electron waves", " 37.6 Watching the electrons", " 37.7 First principles of quantum mechanics", " 37.8 The uncertainty principle", "Chapter 38. The Relation of Wave and Particle Viewpoints", " 38.1 Probability wave amplitudes", " 38.2 Measurement of position and momentum", " 38.3 Crystal diffraction", " 38.4 The size of an atom", "Chapter 39. The Kinetic Theory of Gases", " 39.1 Properties of matter", " 39.2 The pressure of a gas", " 39.3 Compressibility of radiation", " 39.4 Temperature and kinetic energy", " 39.5 The ideal gas law", "Chapter 40. The Principles of Statistical Mechanics", " 40.1 The exponential atmosphere", " 40.2 The Boltzmann law", " 40.3 Evaporation of a liquid", " 40.4 The distribution of molecular speeds", " 40.5 The specific heats of gases", " 40.6 The failure of classical physics", "Chapter 41. The Brownian Movement", " 41.1 Equipartition of energy", " 41.2 Thermal equilibrium of radiation", " 41.3 Equipartition and the quantum oscillator", " 41.4 The random walk", "Chapter 42. Applications of Kinetic Theory", " 42.1 evaporation", " 42.2 Thermionic emission", " 42.3 Thermal ionization", " 42.4 Chemical kinetics", " 42.5 Einstein's laws of radiation", "Chapter 43. Diffusion", " 43.1 Collisions between molecules", " 43.2 The mean free path", " 43.3 The drift speed", " 43.4 Ionic conductivity", " 43.5 Molecular diffusion", " 43.6 Thermal conductivity", "Chapter 44. The Laws of Thermodynamics", " 44.1 Heat engines; the first law", " 44.2 The second law", " 44.3 Reversible engines", " 44.4 The efficiency of an ideal engine", " 44.5 The thermodynamic temperature", " 44.6 Entropy", "Chapter 45. Illustrations of Thermodynamics", " 45.1 Internal energy", " 45.2 Applications", " 45.3 The Clausius-Clapeyron equation", "Chapter 46. Ratchet and Pawl", " 46.1 How a ratchet works", " 46.2 The ratchet as an engine", " 46.3 Reversibility in mechanics", " 46.4 Irreversibility", " 46.5 Order and entropy", "Chapter 47. Sound. The Wave Equation", " 47.1 Waves", " 47.2 The propagation of sound", " 47.3 The wave equation", " 47.4 Solutions of the wave equation", " 47.5 The speed of sound", "Chapter 48. Beats", " 48.1 Adding two waves", " 48.2 Beat notes and modulation", " 48.3 Side bands", " 48.4 Localized wave trains", " 48.5 Probability amplitudes for particles", " 48.6 Waves in three dimensions", " 48.7 Normal modes", "Chapter 49. Modes", " 49.1 The relection of waves", " 49.2 Confined waves, with natural frequencies", " 49.3 Modes in two dimensions", " 49.4 Coupled pendulums", " 49.5 Linear systems", "Chapter 50. Harmonics", " 50.1 Musical tones", " 50.2 The Fourier series", " 50.3 Quality and consonance", " 50.4 The Fourier coefficients", " 50.5 The energy theorem", " 50.6 Nonlinear responses", "Chapter 51. Waves", " 51.1 Bow waves", " 51.2 Shock waves", " 51.3 Waves in solids", " 51.4 Surface waves", "Chapter 52. Symmetry in Physical Laws", " 52.1 Symmetry operations", " 52.2 Symmetry in space and time", " 52.3 Symmetry and conservation laws", " 52.4 Mirror reflections", " 52.5 Polar and axial vectors", " 52.6 Which hand is right?", " 52.7 Parity is not conserved!", " 52.8 Antimatter", " 52.9 Broken symmetries", "Index".

En berømt forelæsningsrække blev omformet til disse noter. ( )
  bnielsen | Apr 16, 2023 |
This is an excellent set of physics lectures. Feynman was very talented at right to heart of the matter and making everything seem obvious. ( )
  DreadedBunny | Aug 10, 2022 |
Like most others who get a chance to know about him, I adore what was Richard Feynman and find him a source of continual inspiration. I study physics at university, and I've given this book a try. It gives clear access to his mind, and I have taken away countless gems that have built up concepts in my mind. I've struggled with it's nature though - I've tried to appraoch it like any other textbook, and found it just doesn't work like that. It's not for systematic study. Instead, I dip into it and read a chapter now and then when it's relevent and can add to current study - more for motivation and inspiration than anything. ( )
1 rösta jculkin | Feb 1, 2016 |
NA
  pszolovits | Feb 3, 2021 |
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Feynman, Richard P.primär författarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Leighton, Robert B.huvudförfattarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Sands, Matthewhuvudförfattarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Köhler, Dr. HeinzÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
Schröder, EckhardÖversättaremedförfattarevissa utgåvorbekräftat
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This is volume one (Mainly Mechanics, Radiation, and Heat) of the three-volume work Feynman Lectures on Physics. It should not be combined with either of the other volumes nor with the entire three-volume work.
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T[hese] books [are] based upon a course of lectures in introductory physics given by Prof. R.P. Feynman at the California Institute of Technology during the academic year 1961-1962; it covers the first year of the two year introductory course taken by all Caltech freshmen and sophormores, and was followed in 1962-63 by a similar series covering the second year.

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