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This Odd and Wondrous Calling: The Public and Private Lives of Two…

av Lillian Daniel, Martin B. Copenhaver

Andra författare: Peter Gomes (Förord)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygDiskussioner
1603134,791 (4.27)Ingen/inga
This Odd and Wondrous Calling offers something different from most books available on ministry. Two people still pastoring reflect honestly here on both the joys and the challenges of their vocation. / Anecdotal and extremely readable, the book covers a diversity of subjects revealing the incredible variety of a pastor’s day. The chapters move from comedy to pathos, story to theology, Scripture to contemporary culture. This Odd and Wondrous Calling is both serious and fun and is ideal for those who are considering the ministry or who want a better understanding of their own minister’s life.… (mer)
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Lillian Daniel and Martin Copenhaver make the simple point that the pastoral life is different. It is different from the perception of outsiders. It is different from the preparations of the seminary. It is even different than the idea new ministers envision for themselves. Living into a call that is both different from the world yet deeply invested in the world makes for some interesting challenges that pastors must deal with if they are to find success in their lives. The title of the book is important for understanding the work of ministry; it is at the same time both odd and wondrous.

The selection of stories that Daniel and Copenhaver present in This Odd and Wondrous Calling do not lend themselves to a specific vision for living life as a pastor, but they do weave together a tapestry that suggests on-the-job training is just as important as formal education in ministry. This point is perhaps best illustrated by Copenhaver’s chapter Shaking Hands when he realizes that the sermon was his time to speak and the time spent at the back of the church shaking hands was his time to listen. Such instate was not taught by the seminary, it was learned over time in ministry. ( )
  cbradley | May 17, 2012 |
A recent Facebook meme has involved sending photo essays for professions, home states, hobbies, and other such things. It involves six photos of “what my parents think I do,” “what my friends think I do,” “what society thinks I do,” and the like. The juxtaposition of differing expectations is meant humorously in this case, but is a challenge common to several professions.

Perhaps it is not surprising that one of the Facebook postings was for pastors, partially because many people have diverse ideas of what ministers should do and primarily because so many people are confused with how ministers spend time outside of worship services. Recently a few books, mostly aimed at seminarians, have attempted to construct a portrait of what ministry can look like. Among these, “This Odd and Wondrous Calling,” by Lillian Daniel and Martin B. Copenhaver, is appreciated because it does not attempt to offer a singular definition of ministry, but rather glimpses of a pastor’s life through 28 essays.

Ranging across topics such as greeting people after worship services to dealing with the issues that ministry raises for a pastor’s marriage, the book offers many insights into “the public and private lives of two ministers,” as the subtitle suggests. Daniel and Copenhaver are both long-time congregational pastors and published authors, and each offers personal essays of integrity and clarity, tackling even uncomfortable topics, such as a rejection from ministry and having a spouse who is a non-churchgoer.

While I imagine that this wonderful book will find an eager audience among clergy, who will appreciate the practical and considered wisdom that the authors share, it may be more useful to laypersons who wonder just what it is that ministers do. In every page, Daniel and Copenhaver not only share what they do and why they do it, but they each reveal a straight-forward humanity, imperfect, but loving and real, that might surprise many churchgoers. By considering the profound and the simple, the distinctive and the ordinary things in their lives, the two pastors offer a gracious gift to people of faith. ( )
  ALincolnNut | Apr 4, 2012 |
I thoroughly enjoyed reading This Odd and Wondrous Calling. The book is written from the perspective of two ministers with distinct vantage points. The variety between the authors' age, gender, and family life made this book richer. Though both come from the UCC background, the book offers something for anyone called to ministry.

Written as a series of reflective essay on various aspects of the ministerial calling, the book isn't held together by an overarching narrative. Daniel and Copenhaver switch off authoring each chapter. I found myself wishing that they would have dialogued a bit about some of the various topics addressed though. Each author has their own style and rhythm. Copenhaver tends to write in a sort of grandfatherly way, looking back over a life of ministry with a sense of accomplishment. In several of the essays his humor shines (e.g. his discussion on shaking hands). Daniel's writing was a real treat. While often poetic, she always maintains a certain emotional authenticity that made me cling on her every word!

I strongly encourage everyone who is discerning a call to ministry to read through this book. It paints a realistic picture for the joys and trials of a ministering life better than any other book I've read on the subject. ( )
  wordstoofew | Sep 27, 2010 |
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Författarens namnRollTyp av författareVerk?Status
Lillian Danielprimär författarealla utgåvorberäknat
Copenhaver, Martin B.huvudförfattarealla utgåvorbekräftat
Gomes, PeterFörordmedförfattarealla utgåvorbekräftat
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This Odd and Wondrous Calling offers something different from most books available on ministry. Two people still pastoring reflect honestly here on both the joys and the challenges of their vocation. / Anecdotal and extremely readable, the book covers a diversity of subjects revealing the incredible variety of a pastor’s day. The chapters move from comedy to pathos, story to theology, Scripture to contemporary culture. This Odd and Wondrous Calling is both serious and fun and is ideal for those who are considering the ministry or who want a better understanding of their own minister’s life.

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