HemGrupperDiskuteraMerTidsandan
Denna webbplats använder kakor för att fungera optimalt, analysera användarbeteende och för att visa reklam (om du inte är inloggad). Genom att använda LibraryThing intygar du att du har läst och förstått våra Regler och integritetspolicy. All användning av denna webbplats lyder under dessa regler.
Hide this

Resultat från Google Book Search

Klicka på en bild för att gå till Google Book Search.

Ranger Confidential: Living, Working, And…
Laddar...

Ranger Confidential: Living, Working, And Dying In The National Parks (utgåvan 2010)

av Andrea Lankford (Författare)

MedlemmarRecensionerPopularitetGenomsnittligt betygOmnämnanden
1369152,413 (3.73)1
The real stories behind the scenery of Americas national parks For twelve years, Andrea Lankford lived in the biggest, most impressive national parks in the world, working a job she loved. She chaperoned baby sea turtles on their journey to sea. She pursued bad guys on her galloping patrol horse. She jumped into rescue helicopters bound for the heart of the Grand Canyon. She won arguments with bears. She slept with a few too many rattlesnakes. Hell yeah, it was the best job in the world! Fortunately, Andrea survived it. In this graphic and yet surprisingly funny account of her and others extraordinary careers, Lankford unveils a world in which park rangers struggle to maintain their idealism in the face of death, disillusionment, and the loss of a comrade killed while holding that thin green line between protecting the park from the people, the people from the park, and the people from each other. Ranger Confidential is the story behind the scenery of the nations crown jewelsYosemite, Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, Great Smokies, Denali. In these iconic landscapes, where nature and humanity constantly collide, scenery can be as cruel as it is redemptive.… (mer)
Medlem:MSchuttLibrary
Titel:Ranger Confidential: Living, Working, And Dying In The National Parks
Författare:Andrea Lankford (Författare)
Info:Falcon Guides (2010), Edition: First, 256 pages
Samlingar:Ditt bibliotek
Betyg:
Taggar:Ingen/inga

Verkdetaljer

Ranger Confidential: Living, Working, and Dying in the National Parks av Andrea Lankford

Ingen/inga
Laddar...

Gå med i LibraryThing för att få reda på om du skulle tycka om den här boken.

Det finns inga diskussioner på LibraryThing om den här boken.

» Se även 1 omnämnande

Visa 1-5 av 9 (nästa | visa alla)
I'd never given it much thought, but there is more to a park ranger's job than meets the eye. Sometimes much more.

An interesting read. ( )
  parloteo | Dec 21, 2019 |
To begin positively, this book really opened my eyes! I had no idea how hard it was to be a park ranger, and how many difficult challenges they face! Robberies, assaults, and death seem to be just as much a part of the job as camp fires and nature talks! My large hat is off to them!

As for my feelings about this book, well, I don't think I liked it. It seems much to focused on death, and in very descriptive, stomach-churning detail. Each person introduced has some horrible death in their story. Most of the calls described are about dead people. If I were even remotely thinking about being a ranger, this book would totally turn me off.

It seems like the author did not like her job, her co-workers, or, most especially, the public. It says that she did it for 12 years, but I have no idea why. The book is titled "Ranger Confidential" but it really should be "Reasons Why Being a Park Ranger Sucks". I'm so glad I never met her in any park I've visited, nor any of the people she describes in here. My large hat off to all the rangers who have made all of my visits so special! ( )
  Stahl-Ricco | Sep 19, 2018 |
Interesting and entertaining look into a NPS Rangre's life ( )
  cubsfan3410 | Sep 1, 2018 |
Ranger Confidential is Andrea Lankford's memoir of her time spent as a Ranger for the US National Parks service. Her story removes the veil from the idealistic and glamorous view some may have of life as a park ranger and gives you insight into the challenges these brave souls encounter every single day. We follow a handful of brave adventurers throughout their careers. These rangers may have the most scenic views on the planet from their bedroom (tent/ranger station), but this is far overshadowed by the harrowing rescues and the constant confrontations with hiker hubris. Chapter after chapter describes the risks park rangers take performing such acts as cliff-side rescues and body recoveries from El Capitan in Yosemite to rappelling from a helicopter to airlift injured hikers from the Grand Canyon.

Most memorable for me was following the career of Cale Schaffer who started out mentoring at-risk youths, teaching them about the parks and assisting when needed with search and rescue operations at the Grand Canyon. The technique of preventive search and rescue employed by Cale helped reduce the number of hiker related deaths and incidents in the Grand Canyon. A few short years later Cale's life was cut short due to a plane crash while working at Denali National Park.

I have two takeaways after reading this book: (1) I can safely remove Park Ranger from my list of potential future career options. (2) Listen to what the Rangers tell you if you are visiting a national park. It may save your life. ( )
  JechtShot | Jun 21, 2016 |
The author of this book describes what it’s like to work in the American national parks (and not only as a ranger). The focus is very much on the park employees and other (human) park residents, not on the parks themselves, so if you’re looking for a book about nature or wildlife, this is not it. However, this is a very interesting book, and so even though it proved not to be the sort of book I had expected, I was not disappointed.

Everybody knows that the US national parks are understaffed and that its rangers are underpaid. Most people assume that it’s because the parks receive insufficient funding. However, Lankford points out that the National Parks Service has no problem getting huge sums of money from Congress for expensive and pointless projects, such as “$2.5 million to convert a railroad station into a fancy visitor center in Thurmond, WV – a town with a population of eight…. In Ohio officials at Cuyahoga Valley National Park invested more than $425,000 on a private vineyard and winery. Delaware Water Gap is home to the infamous $333,000 outhouse. Grand Canyon officials have spent millions to build a trainless train station and a Canyon View Information Plaza with no canyon view. Now they are asking for more money to ‘fix’ these failed projects.” And, of course, hotel and concessionary businesses in the national parks are multi-million dollar enterprises.

Taking these facts into account it’s hard to understand why the Yosemite rangers and hotel and concessionary employees have to live in tents year round, even if it means shoveling snow off the tents’ tops in winter and enduring temperatures soaring above 110F in the summer (and, to add insult to injury, they actually pay rent for these tents to their employers). Or why seasonal rangers get paid two dollars above minimal pay per hour, while concessionaire wages are so puny, that “in order to fill all the positions supervisors are forced to hire people with unsavory pasts,” such as rapists and “surly drunks who stabbed and shot people.” “The concessionaire pack these people into the same dorms with the other employees – simple-minded and easygoing working people, good-hearted dopers, down-on-their-luck displaced wanderers, retired couples, and naïve college students on summer break. Chris [Fors, a ranger] began to see how, by cramming all these people under one roof, the park concessionaire had created a human environment similar to the one enjoyed by the park’s wildlife: a place for predators and prey to interact.” So much so, in fact, that the rangers at the Grand Canyon have nicknamed Victor Hall there Victim Hall. “Sometimes slips of the tongue were made on the radio. ‘Dispatch, I’m on scene at Victim Hall…. Oops! Scratch that. I mean Victor Hall.’”

However, interestingly, rangers and concession and hotel employees mostly aren’t friends, despite the hardships and exploitation they both suffer from, because many of the overworked concession and hotel employees use “recreational drugs,” for which they get arrested by the rangers. To persuade the readers not to judge the drug users too harshly, the author writes, “You try making thousands of beds, scrubbing thousands of toilets, or serving thousands of plates of doughy white food to doughy white people without using something to help ease it off. You try serving and cleaning up after thousands of impatient vacationers.”

Park rangers also generally work very long hours, and if some emergency situation happens at night (which is not at all uncommon) they work day and night and the next day. As Lankford says, the only way for a ranger to have an uninterrupted night of sleep is to unhook the phone and the only way to have a day off is to hike into the backcountry without telling anybody where he/she went. Rangers also have to pay for attending training courses in order to perform complicated rescue operations, provide emergency medical services on the spot, do autopsies on corpses and master various other skills necessary for their jobs – although they don’t get paid anything extra for acquiring these skills and performing these duties. And if that wasn’t enough, “in the United States, a park ranger is more likely to be assaulted in the line of duty than any other federal officer” and “twelve times more likely to die on the job than a special agent for the FBI.” No wonder that park ranger often get burned out, and a popular place for them to seek a new employment appears to be FBI, judging from this book.

I was also surprised to learn that in some national parks communities of rock climbers live year round, in order to pursue their hobby. The parks often offer them rent-free tents in return for volunteering in mountain rescue operations, but I don’t understand how they obtain food and other necessities. Another surprising fact that I learned is that the Grand Canyon is a popular place to commit suicide by jumping or driving off the rim of the canyon, especially since the release of a movie in which two criminals drive their car off the rim of the canyon rather than be arrested and go to prison.

In short, this is a book about what it’s like to work at a national park, mostly focusing on Yosemite and the Grand Canyon, although there are also some stories about the Denali and different National Seashore parks on the Atlantic, mostly taking place in the 1990s, although the book was published in 2010 (the author also left park service after getting burned out after 12 years on the job). I did find it very interesting, although countless accounts of rescuing people who fell off cliffs got a bit repetitive for me, and I wished there was more on the life of the wildlife in the parks over the seasons. However, it did give me a better understanding and appreciation for the parks’ employees work. It’s not like I imagined their lives to be a non-stop vacation, but I thought that rangers mostly direct traffic and provide directions to tourists. Besides descriptions of the hardships and emergency situations faced by rangers, there are some descriptions of beautiful places and there’s humor, as when Lankford writes about vacationers who hike down into the Grand Canyon only to discover later how tiresome it is to hike back up and demand to have emergency helicopters sent to take them back to the top, threatening to send letters to their congresspersons if their demands aren’t met. (Congresspersons’ mail must be considerably more entertaining than I had imagined.) ( )
  Ella_Jill | Mar 5, 2016 |
Visa 1-5 av 9 (nästa | visa alla)
inga recensioner | lägg till en recension
Du måste logga in för att ändra Allmänna fakta.
Mer hjälp finns på hjälpsidan för Allmänna fakta.
Vedertagen titel
Originaltitel
Alternativa titlar
Första utgivningsdatum
Personer/gestalter
Viktiga platser
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Viktiga händelser
Relaterade filmer
Priser och utmärkelser
Motto
Dedikation
Inledande ord
Citat
Avslutande ord
Särskiljningsnotis
Förlagets redaktörer
På baksidan citeras
Ursprungsspråk
Information från den engelska sidan med allmänna fakta. Redigera om du vill anpassa till ditt språk.
Kanonisk DDC/MDS

Hänvisningar till detta verk hos externa resurser.

Wikipedia på engelska

Ingen/inga

The real stories behind the scenery of Americas national parks For twelve years, Andrea Lankford lived in the biggest, most impressive national parks in the world, working a job she loved. She chaperoned baby sea turtles on their journey to sea. She pursued bad guys on her galloping patrol horse. She jumped into rescue helicopters bound for the heart of the Grand Canyon. She won arguments with bears. She slept with a few too many rattlesnakes. Hell yeah, it was the best job in the world! Fortunately, Andrea survived it. In this graphic and yet surprisingly funny account of her and others extraordinary careers, Lankford unveils a world in which park rangers struggle to maintain their idealism in the face of death, disillusionment, and the loss of a comrade killed while holding that thin green line between protecting the park from the people, the people from the park, and the people from each other. Ranger Confidential is the story behind the scenery of the nations crown jewelsYosemite, Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, Great Smokies, Denali. In these iconic landscapes, where nature and humanity constantly collide, scenery can be as cruel as it is redemptive.

Inga biblioteksbeskrivningar kunde hittas.

Bokbeskrivning
Haiku-sammanfattning

Snabblänkar

Populära omslag

Betyg

Medelbetyg: (3.73)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 2
3 8
3.5 2
4 13
4.5 1
5 5

Är det här du?

Bli LibraryThing-författare.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Sekretess/Villkor | Hjälp/Vanliga frågor | Blogg | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterlämnade bibliotek | Förhandsrecensenter | Allmänna fakta | 155,520,374 böcker! | Topplisten: Alltid synlig